Banmi Shofu Ryu originated from Shofu Ryu.  Its name translates to pine or living breeze, and Shofu creations express a spirit of naturalness, as effortless as the wind on the pines on a summer day; they show both fluidity of line and fidelity to the way plants grow in nature.  In addition to its naturalness, the hallmark feature of the school is its use of driftwood, not as an artifice, but as a way of connecting with the spirit of driftwood in creating a floral design.  Driftwood pieces literally come to life as they infused floral designs with their living spirit.

Banmi Shofu Hallmark Complex Moribana 2001*

Materials:  Alpinia (Tropical Torch Ginger), upright Heliconia, Costus Barbatus (Spiral Ginger), & Heirloom Complex Moribana, 2001Fennel, Seaweed and Bamboo Whip with driftwood from Waialua and the Philippines

Moribana is one of the classic expressions of Banmi Shofu Ryu, one or more clusters of arrangements in kenzan to replicate how water plants grow, and how creatures move around in natural ponds.  Choice of materials and how much water shows in front, side, or back reflects the passing of the season; for example more water to the front during Spring or Summer.

 

BoatDesign, 2010Iri – fume, 2010*
Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials:  Lilium Asiaticum (Asiatic Lily, Siberian variety), Philodendron Xanadu and Waialua Driftwood
Banmi Shofu boat designs are oriented either to the right or left indicated by the direction of the material used to represent the oar.

*Boat Design from Otsukimi festival, Guang Ming Temple, Orlando, FL, 2010

Bansho Chabana 2009Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials: Phalaenopsis Blume (Butterfly Orchid); Miniature Magnolia Leaf, Waialua driftwood
Chabana is a form of significance in Banmi Shofu Ryu, because of not only its use in chado or formal tea ceremony, but also its clarity in character, enlightenment, and mindful expression
Giving Myself Permission
Rush hour to temporary lodging, and once again, I am off the road.  Goodbye to laptop, luggage, & everyone.  Crawling into my womb space with flower, book, or nothing – unaccompanied, yet surrounded.  Silence sings.

Caladium Oseika, 1998-001Moribana, 2000*
Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials: Florida Caladium Bicolor & Ruellia Brittoniana (Mexican Petunia), Driftwood from St. John’s River courtesy of Margaret; driftwood from St. John’s River courtesy of Margaret

 

Boat Moribana

 

 

Moribana, 2015*
Greg Banshakuyaku Alderson, Nara no Nin, Level III, 3rd Grade Instructor, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials:  Iris Hollandica (Dutch Iris), American Sweet Gum and Asparagaceae, Driftwood from Waialua

 

 

 

 

Chabana on Alaskan Driftwood, Bansho, Epcot 2015Chabana, 2015
Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials:  Lilium Asiaticum (Orange Miniature Asiatic Lily), Steel Grass and Driftwood from Alaska used as stand

 

 

 

Spring Moribana, 2015Spring Moribana, Bansho Epcot 2015

Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu

Materials:  Dutch Irises and Steel Grass; Driftwood from Alaska

Haiku:  Blowing wind and rain.  In the heart cobwebs never weave stories untrue.

 

 

 

Nageire Taisaku, 2011*
Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu

Materials:  Rosa (Coppery orange garden rose called Remember Me of hybrid tea size with floribunda habit) & Dianella Tasmanica Variegata (Variegated New Zealand Flax Lily), Variegated Shell Ginger and Driftwood from St. John’s River, FL

Taisaku translates into the word epic, and ikebana taisaku are just like that – larger than life designs used in large spaces for special occasions or staged demonstrations.  A simple one such as featured here depicts the minimalistic lines required to make a definitive statement of Banmi Shofu philosophical stance and legacy.

Double Nageire, 2015*Double Nageire, Bansho, Epcot 2015
Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials:  Protea Cynaroides (King Protea), Lady Palm Fronds and Driftwood from St. John’s River, FL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Morimono_2010-001Morimono, 2010*
Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu

Materials:  Persimmon, Pomegranate, & Key Lime, Brassavola Nodosa (Yellow Brassavola),Lemon Grass Stalks & Rosemary, Vintage Nagoya obi

Haiku:  Ginger, garlic, green onions, cilantro, saffron, sweet rice ~ good eating!
Morimono designs comprise mostly fruits, sometimes vegetables with flowers minimally serving as enhancements rather than focus.

Hashibana Maru, 2015*Hashibana Maru, Bansho, Epcot 2015-001
Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials:  Lilium Asiaticum (Siberian Lily), Ficus Carica (Kadota Fig Branch), Driftwood from Waialua

About Hashibana: Upon his installation as Iemoto, Ric Bansho introduced a Banmi Shofu form with three expressions:  Hashibana Maru (oval or global), Uate (tall, narrow & wide) & Saba (short, narrow & wide) depending on container shape.

e_banshoriccarrasco_doublehashibana_2010 (1)-001Double Hashibana Uate, 2010*
Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials:  Asteracea Chrysanthemum (Football & Fuji Mums), Trimmed Pinus Palustris (Long Needled Pine), Driftwood from Waialua, Vintage Golden Japanese Brocade

Conforming with Tradition, Flowing into Now

Through flowers, I am one with the founding Samurai.  He was rough & aggressive, yet tender & delicate with his Kado.  Like it or not, legacy evolves. 

 

Hashibana Saba, 2015Hashibana Saba Tribute to Saga Kiku
Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials:  Gladioli & Dutch Irises, Papyrus, Driftwood from St. John’s River, FL
Haiku:  Wax and wane to sun moon.  Cycle triumphantly rising dewdrops land on nose.

 

 

 

Oseika & Chabana, Banshakuyaku, Epcot 2015Top, Oseika, 2015*
Greg Banshakuyaku Alderson, Nara no Nin, Level III, Grade 3 Instructor, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials:  Asteracea Chrysanthemum (Fuji Mum), Bear Grass, Driftwood from St. John’s River,

Bottom, Chabana, 2015*
Greg Banshakuyaku Alderson, Nara no Nin, Level III, Grade 3 Instructor, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials:  Asteracea Chrysanthemum (Spider Mum), Magnolia Leaf and driftwood from Alaska

 

 

 

Nageire, 2015*Nageire, Bansho, Epcot 2015
Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials:  Lilium Asiaticum (Orange Asiatic Lilies), Trimmed Pinus Palustris (Long Needled Pine), Driftwood is Bamboo Root from Philippines

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3020-001Kansui Ike Moribana, 2014*
Ric Bansho Carrasco, 2nd Generation Iemoto, Banmi Shofu Ryu
Materials:  Curcuma Petiolata (Hidden Lily, or Thai Tulip) & Limonium Altaica Montana (Limonium), African Iris Blades & Variegated Hosta, Driftwood from Okinawa, Samurai Origami
Haiku:  Osawa calm through thousand years flower acceptance free there not here…

 

 

 

Synchronized Oseika, 2009

Synchronized Oseika, 2009*
Laurel Banbara, Ric Bansho Carrasco & Jesus Bantake Minguez
Flower:  Bromeliaceae Ananas (Ornamental Pineapple, a Bromeliad), Hawaiian Ti Leaves

Seika was a popular form in the 16th century and Shofu Ryu practitioners used it extensively, (Richie & Weatherby, 1966).  Contemporary Banmi Shofu Ryu refers to Seika in a respectful manner, referring to it as Oseika, and in addition to using the form in distinctive informal designs, it is typical for Banmi Shofu demonstrations to end with a synchronized Oseika where participating sensei create the design in unison by picking up and inserting each line material to the tune of a meditation bell, finishing the design with one flower and a unifying driftwood.