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The Spirit of Ikenobo Ikebana

Nurtured by special appreciation of Nature, changing seasons and understanding the beauty of flowers and plants.  Our hearts are cleansed in the bright freshness and purity of flowers. 

 

The Ikenobo school of ikebana uses the phrase, “Origin of Ikebana” because it was the first “school” of ikebana. This school of Ikebana has evolved signicantly over 550 years. The current headmaster, Sen’ei Ikenobo is the 45th headmaster and his daughter, Yuki Ikenobo, is currently the headmaster designate. The Ikenobo school of ikebana has styles of arranging that are complex and simple at the same time and all reflect an understanding and great appreciation of nature. There are five basic styles within the Ikenobo school: Shoka Shofutai (designs with one, two or three materials dating from the 1700’s but evolving to reflect changes in materials and placement of an arrangement) Shoka Shimputai (designs with three materials; developed by the 45th headmaster in 1977) Rikka Shofutuai (more complex designs with historical signifigance from the 1600’s) Rikka Shimputai (complex design with a modern expression; developed by the current headmaster in 1998) Free Style (a constantly evolving style) Please enjoy examples of the Ikenobo school in the designs pictured below from a variety of Senior Professors and their students throughout the U.S.

The following three designs are examples of Ikenobo Rikka style dating back to the 1600’s when the monks created them as offerings to Buddha and attempted to “recreate” what they were seeing in nature.

 

Emiko Suzuki - I.I. Asheville

Emiko Suzuki – I.I. Asheville

 

The two designs below are also Rikka’s but are examples of the 1998 style, Rikka Shimputai.  The emulate many of the lines of the older Rikka Shofutai designs, but with a simplier, modern and lighter feel overall .

Both designs created by Emiko Suzuki, I.I. Asheville

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Shoka Shofutai is a primary style in Ikenobo; below are three examples:

  • Isshuike – one material design
  • Nishuike – two materials in the design
  • Sanshuike – three materials in the design

 

Nishuike Shoka; Invitation to Ikenobo Shoka Shofutai I

Nishuike Shoka; Invitation to Ikenobo Shoka Shofutai I

Isshuike Shoka in traditional bronze; Roseanne Brandon, I.I. Naples FL

Isshuike Shoka in traditional bronze; Roseanne Brandon, I.I. Naples FL

 

 

Sanshuike Shoka; Mary Takahashi; Joy of Ikenobo

Sanshuike Shoka; Mary Takahashi; Joy of Ikenobo

The designs below are examples of Shoka Shofutai using special bamboo containers used primarily for these unique designs.

Following are two designs exemplifying Shoka Shimputai; a design created by the current 45th headmaster of Ikenobo, Sen’ei Ikenobo, in 1977.

 

Ikenobo also has a Free Style – enjoy!